July 6, 2015

Summer Reading Recommendations

Filed under: Books — Emily Reeves @ 7:13 pm

Are you looking for a fun summer read? Here are my five favorite light-read books from my 2015 library, so far.

Summer Reading July 15

Big Little Lies: Set in Australia, a group of women become friends when their children attend school together. There is a mystery strung throughout but you have to wait until the twisty ending for the big reveal.

The Knockoff: A Novel: A fashion magazines tries to go tech by kicking out the old and bringing in the young. And it all goes wrong.

Luckiest Girl Alive: A Novel: A young woman living in New York seems to have it all. However her dark past is revealed as the book progresses.

The Rosie Project: A Novel: A professor with Asberger’s Syndrome decides it is time to find a wife. So naturally, he approaches it scientifically. The Rosie comes along.

What Alice Forgot: A fall leaves Alice without her memory from the last decade. She awakes to the person she was 10 years ago, who was much happier (and nicer) than the person she has become now.

June 29, 2015

Book Review: Leave Your Mark

Filed under: Books,Social Media — Emily Reeves @ 5:16 pm

This is a quick read, behind-the-scenes dish from the original DKNY PR GIRL on Twitter (@dkny) telling how she got her start, her secrets for success and her early leap into social media as a brand. I have enjoyed following DKNY PR GIRL for years (and been jealous of her adventures), but I never knew the story behind the handle. It was a fun read and one that I recommend to any fresh college graduate looking for a job in the communications business. From dress, to language, to attitude, Aliza Licht has advice for taking a career to the next level and embracing change along the way.

March 24, 2015

Book Review: Better and Faster

Filed under: Books,SXSW,That's Just Cool — Emily Reeves @ 10:30 pm

I experienced Jeremy Gutsche at SXSW this year. I say experienced because he was a performer and I was pleased to have been on the first row of this performance. I walked straight from his session to the SXSW bookstore to purchase his Better and Faster book. I read it cover-to-cover in one day.

Rather than espousing theory and principles for building businesses from ideas, Gutsche provides real examples that are not the overused Apple, Google and Facebook stories of success. Those brands are included, of course. But there are more stories about individuals with a solution to a problem that grew into a business than there are big brands that everyday people can’t identify with as a real opportunity.

The theme throughout the book is that change will happen and spotting trends on the horizon will keep you or your business relevant. The book provides charts, diagrams and steps for identifying business opportunity. I was inspired and making notes as I went along. And Gutsche’s Trend Hunter website is going to be a new regular read for me.

March 23, 2015

Book Review: #GIRLBOSS

Filed under: Books,Business,Entrepreneurship — Emily Reeves @ 10:30 pm

I started and finished #GIRLBOSS by Sophia Amoruso in one sitting on a Saturday morning. Sophia is not only a great storyteller, but has a fascinating story to tell. She is honest, doesn’t try to be something she is not and her writing style makes her feel more like a friend than a CEO of a company she built by herself.

I am not a Nasty Girl customer, but will certainly be shopping there for my next purchases if for no other reason than I want to support a company that I like. The style is pretty awesome, too. At 36 years old, I’m just not always confident I can pull off some of those looks!

Though Sophia didn’t start out with aspirations to be a public figure and role model, she has embraced those roles for entrepreneurs of all types. She literally started selling clothes on eBay because she had a knack for finding vintage pieces and needed to make a rent payment every month. Startup stories like this are the best ones, in my opinion. It seems that the startup community is now too focused on technology, having a quick growth (and exit) plan, and quick frankly, too full of young, arrogant guys. Sophia bucks all these trends, plus many other “requirements” to start a new business, which is what makes her an inspiration.

At the core of the advice she gives throughout the book, the consistent message is work hard. This is so refreshing coming from someone who falls squarely into the “millennial” generation that thinks they should be given rewards rather than earning and seemingly eschews hard work and starting at the bottom to gradually make a way to the top, only if it is deserved.

This book was practical, but entertaining. It was proof that starting with nothing but hunger, a passion, and a willingness to work your ass off can lead to success.

January 2, 2015

My Favorite Books of 2014

Filed under: Books,Girl Gets Geeky,Personal — Emily Reeves @ 2:28 pm

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I read 61 books in 2014. For comparison, in 2013 I read 90 books and in 2012 I read 60 books. But it seems that the books I read in 2014 were longer than books I have read in the past years; the graph below represents number of pages read each year:

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Though I didn’t beat last year or come close to my goal of 120 books, 61 books in a year is a respectable number. I didn’t make great choices in my books this year, so finding the standouts was fairly easy. For some reason, I read too many dystopian future books (seven of the 61 were set in the future). Here are my favorites in each of three categories:

Top Business Books

  1. Creativity, Inc. by Ed Catmul
  2. Show Your Work by Austin Kleon
  3. Show and Tell by Dan Roam
  4. It’s Complicated by danah boyd

Top Other Non-Fiction Books

  1. Unbroken by Laura Hillenbrand
  2. Five Days At Memorial by Sheri Fink

Top Fiction Books

  1. The Interestings by Meg Wolitzer
  2. Ready Player One by Ernest Cline
  3. The Vacationers by Emma Staub
  4. The Goldfinch by Donna Tartt
  5. The Children Act by Ian McEwan

July 26, 2014

Book Review: Show Your Work

Filed under: Books — Emily Reeves @ 2:50 pm

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I can’t remember how I was first introduced to Austin Kleon’s work, but I’ve been following him ever since. Books, keynotes, Twitter, enewsletter and his blog all feed my hunger for his words of wisdom. I picked up this copy of Show Your Work at SXSW this year, but just now picked it up from my nightstand to read it. And I read it all in one sitting this afternoon.

In the book, he addresses the question of “getting discovered.” It is about so much more than that though. It is about the creative process and the work that goes into the end product. The value of the work that goes into the product is just as important as the delivered work, according to Kleon. Especially for building an engaged audience who feels apart of  the work that you are creating.

I loved this book and recommend it to anyone needing creative inspiration.

Book Review: Creativity, Inc.

Filed under: Books — Emily Reeves @ 11:12 am

After reading this review of Creativity, Inc., by Ed Catmull,  from my boss, I was excited to get my own copy and delve into its stories and insights. The opening of the book immediately connected with me as Catmull explained his career path and the challenges he faced moving from a role of directly being a film-maker to more generally being creative culture leader. In his words, “As I turned my attention from solving technical problems to engaging with the philosophy of sound management, I was excited once again — and sure that our second act could be as exhilarating as our first.”

With my pen in hand, ready to underline and take notes, I excitedly plowed through the 300-page book. I feel like I marked up well over half the book — it was that good and relevant. This is a book for company leaders seeking advice from an experienced manager on how to engage creative teams, yet keep them disciplined and interested. I was able to draw many parallels to the book Good to Great, by Jim Collins, as a modern-day bible for creative leadership and taking a business to the next level by “getting the right people on the bus.”

My favorite takeaways and associated quotes:

Team matters.
“Getting the team right is the necessary precursor to getting the ideas right.”

The story matters.
“For all the care you put into artistry, visual polish frequently doesn’t matter if you are getting the story right.”

Passion matters.
“It was unthinkable that we not do our best.”

Mistakes matter.
“The silver linking of a major meltdown is that it gives managers a chance to send clear signals to employees about the company’s values, which inform the role each individual is expected to play.”

Honesty matters.
“…without the critical ingredient that is candor, there can be no trust. And without trust, creative collaboration is not possible.”

People matter.
“The responsibility for finding and fixing problems should be assigned to every employee, from the most senior manager to the lowliest person on the production line.”

I highly recommend this book to leaders in creative companies and those just generally interested in the “behind-the-scenes” business and insider stories of Pixar Animation.

December 31, 2013

My Favorite Books of 2013

Filed under: Books,Girl Gets Geeky,Personal — Emily Reeves @ 10:25 am

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In 2012, I read 60 books and set my 2013 goal at 75. In 2013, I read 89 books (and I just might finish one more today to make it an even 90). I am not going to lie: I am pretty proud of myself for this accomplishment and will likely brag about it for the next 12 months.

As with last year, I am sharing my top five reads in each of three categories. The links are to my reviews on Goodreads.

Business books (or, what I consider books that I can apply to my business):

  1. Epic Content Marketing by Joe Pullizi
  2. Get Lucky by Thor Muller
  3. Without Their Permission by Alexis Ohanian
  4. A/B Testing by Dan Siroker
  5. The War of Art by Steven Pressfield

Other non-fiction books:

  1. Quiet: The Power of Introverts by Susan Cain
  2. How To Be Interesting by Jessica Hagy
  3. Die Empty by Todd Henry
  4. Haiti: A Shattered Nation by Elizabeth Abbott
  5. The First 20 Hours: How To Learn Anything Fast by Josh Kaufman

Fiction books:

  1. The Circle by Dave Eggers
  2. The Luminaries by Eleanor Catton
  3. The Twelve-Fingered Boy by John Hornor Jacobs
  4. Mr. Penumbra’s 24-Hour Bookstore by Robin Sloan
  5. A Constellation of Vital Phenomena by Anthony Marra

For 2014, my goal is 120 books. Ten books a month: I don’t know if I can do it, but I will have fun trying. If you follow me over on Goodreads, you can keep up with the books as I read them.